Why hot rod?

There are several theories about the origin of the term hot rod. The common theme is that heat is related to heating a car, which means modifying it for greater performance.

Why hot rod?

There are several theories about the origin of the term hot rod. The common theme is that heat is related to heating a car, which means modifying it for greater performance. One theory is that rod means roadster, a lightweight 2-door car that was often used as the basis for early hot rods. Often called a street rod, a hot rod is a classic American car with an oversized engine modified for speed.

The idea for the backyard Hot Rod store had returned and these magnificent vehicles became symbols of American creativity and ingenuity. The first Hot Rod exhibition took place in Los Angeles at the National Guard Armory in January 1948; 10,000 people attended this famous event. In the 70s, hot rodders made an effort to change their reputation to earn respect for their customization of high-performance cars. In its simplest form, the term hot rod, used as a noun, is a reference to a vehicle that has been modified in some way to make it faster, handle it better, look better or sound better.

After soups gained notoriety after the Great Depression, hot rod popularity skyrocketed in California. Although many people still link the term hot rod to classic cars, the term is still used today to describe cars that have been “modified”. Hot rod communities are further divided into specialized subcultures that will suit just about any taste, whether it's a street hot rod, a custom hot rod, or a vintage work you like. Hot rod culture is still alive and well with fans in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Sweden and Canada.

Hot rodders continue to gather across the United States to showcase their latest custom creations at local car clubs and street rod community events. The hot rod was born when factory cars were stripped of their non-essential features to improve performance. He offered: “These days, if you put a new set of rubber on your wheels, you can claim that you have rolled your car. A few years later, Parks went on to form the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA), and Petersen, building on the momentum of the mega-successful Hot Rod magazine, built a magazine publishing empire.

Some of the major national auto shows include Detroit Autorama, America's Most Beautiful Roadster and Street Rod Nationals sponsored by the largest hot rod club in the United States, the National Street Rod Association. Hot rodding's popularity declined in the 1980s, although several “groups clandestine rebels” continued to defend the cause.