What car makes a good hot rod?

The Model B was an iconic addition to the Ford line and is a great rod. It is so popular that the body has been remade with fiberglass and steel replicas.

What car makes a good hot rod?

The Model B was an iconic addition to the Ford line and is a great rod. It is so popular that the body has been remade with fiberglass and steel replicas. Continuing with the sleek sledge look vehicle, we bring you the Mercury Hardtop 1950. It's as attractive as the Zephyr, but easier to find, making it a more economical option (more hardcovers were manufactured in 1950 than in 1937).

Like the Fiat 500, the Ford Fiesta is a small car that is better suited to urban driving. The Fiesta also has a 197-horsepower performance variant called the Fiesta ST. There have been rumors that the Fiesta could have an even more powerful RS version like the Focus, but we say that's not enough. We say the Fiesta should take the 5.2-liter V8 out of the Shelby GT350R.

Now that would be the ultimate party. Hot Rod magazine defined the term as one of the first American cars to be modified to improve its appearance and performance. In the early days, the term applied almost exclusively to disassembled roadsters built for acceleration. The definition has been expanded to cover almost any type of motor vehicle so modified for the street or for racing.

There you have it, 7 classic cars that have managed to become favorites among Hot Rod enthusiasts around the world. Let's show the world that hot rods are incredible as ever by filling the Motorious Online Car Show with these impressive attractions. Raised in a car-obsessed environment from an early age he ensured a keen interest in anything car-related. This is where traditional hot rods emerge; cars destined to replicate what would have been built before 1965, to the style of construction and the age of the parts used.

Take off the Carrozzeria Ghia style body and you're left with a basic chassis ready for some major upgrades. It was a more socially acceptable term at a time when hot rods were associated with thugs and juvenile delinquents. The descriptive term for cars, usually Ford, manufactured between 1935 and 1948 that featured large removable (not integral) fenders. Characterized by a body that sits well above the front wheels, the front of the car is raised and placed on a solid front axle for better weight transfer.

We'll come back later to talk about body modification and paint terms, engine and suspension jargon, and slang words that have made their way into common use and some that have worked but need to come back. Possibly first coined by Gray Baskerville of HOT ROD magazine, it refers to rods intentionally built in a rough and rusty style to attract attention and provoke a reaction. It refers to the typical muscle cars of the 60s built for the street, but with the components and style of an endurance racer. Some are made for driving, others are made just for drooling assuming your drool is made from ingredients that match those in premium car wax.

It is used to describe a hot rod built with modern style and technology that generally includes independent front and rear suspension, modern fuel-injected engines, renewed interiors, billet aluminum wheels and radial performance tires, and updated electronics.